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Press releases

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The Daily Telegraph / Reviewed by Ivan Hewett

But the most impressive performer was the Serbian accordion player Milos Milivojevic. He caught the affectionate and wry folkiness of Berio’s Sequenza No. 13 and the deadpan with of Howard Skempton’s Twin Set and Pearls with equal aplomb, and projected both pieces with an extraordinary intensity.
08
January 2004
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Independent / Reviewed by Keith Potter

Yet it is the accordionist – perhaps surprisingly, but not for the first time in my experiences of the PLG bonanza – who steals the show. The 19-year-old Milos Milivojevic is a very serious Serb indeed; he doesn’t smile once, even after capping his contributions with a searing account of Magnus Lindberg’s Jeux D’anches. But, playing everything from memory, he demonstrates not merely that this squeeze-box is capable of passion and power, but all the drama and nuance you’d hope for in a performer on a more promising instrument. The contrasting challenges of Berio’s Sequenza No 13 and Skempton’s Twin Set and Pearls are met by Milivojevic with equal focus,... Read More
08
January 2004
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The Guardian / Reviewed by Erica Jeal

However, the highlights came from a perhaps unexpected source: the young Serbian accordionist Milos Milivojevic. Berio’s Sequenza No 13 – its first UK performance – and Lindberg’s frenzied Jeux D’anches showed him to be a serious and fearless virtuoso. But it had been in Anthony Gilbert’s new Rose Luisante, inspired by a window in Bayeux Cathedral and drawing on the accordion’s associations with French music and the organ, that we had been first introduced to the intensity, color and even sensuality of Milivojevic’s playing. Judging by the speed with which Gilbert bounded on to the platform to shake his hand afterwards, he was a very happy composer.
07
January 2004
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The Times online / Reviewed by Hilary Finch

This year’s week-long voyage into the unknown began with an immediate and thrilling sighting: a 19-year’s old Serbian accordion player called Milos Milivojevic, playing four outstanding and virtuoso new works for the instrument – and all from memory. Even the classical accordion, the Rolls Royce of squeeze-boxes, carries within it both the compressed, manic energies and the melancholy of the world’s popular music’s, its tangos and its secret tendresses. Luciano Berio in 1995 packed it all into his Sequenza No13. And scarcely eight months after the composer’s death, it was moving to hear the work’s UK premiere at last, its shuddering and fluttering chords, its dramatically inflected timbres and its... Read More
07
January 2004
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MUSICALPOINTERS / Reviewed by © Peter Grahame Woolf

Gordon & Rautio shared the platform with Milos Milivojevic, a gifted young virtuoso on the bayan (classical accordion – the one with buttons and no piano keys). In recent years this wondrous machine has really come into its own and into mainstream contemporary composition; accordion playing standards are disconcertingly high. Fascinating to watch, the arrangement of the notes is as bizarre and inscrutable as those of the cimbalom. Milivojevic had a real coup for PLG in bringing us the belated UK premiere of Berio’s Sequenza of 1995 and he capped this with Magnus Lindberg’s Jeux D’anches which had made him feel he was ‘composing for an orchestra of wind instruments’.... Read More
05
January 2004
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Evening Standard / Reviewed by Nick Kimberley

…No such a problem with accordionist Milos Milivojevic, born in Serbia and, like his fellow performers, a student in London. For a start, he needed no score, not even for Anthony Gilbert’s Rose Luisante receiving its world premiere. Like an organ improvisation, this juxtaposed long, slow chords with fast filigrees which almost danced. It was clearly a thorough technical workout, which Milivojevic made sound easeful and natural. He laid out Howard Skempton’s enigmatically simple Twin Set and Pearls with calm impassivity, while Luciano Berio’s Sequenza 13, whit its fluttering tremors and wheezy groans, might have converted the most ardent accordionophobe.
06
January 2000